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hi everyone, 

let me attach here an excellent article from the philippine journalism review's PJR reports (access the latest issue at http://www.cmfr.com.ph/_pjrreports/2008/may-june/0508_front.html). the PJR reports is a monthly media monitoring publication which includes incisive articles about media practice, ethics and issues, and is pulished by the center for media freedom and responsibility (CMFR)  (access their website here: http://www.cmfr.com.ph) if there is one media organization you should know about, it should be the CMFR: it monitors and analyzes mass media performance and operations in the philippines and tackles issues that are relevant to the press.  

anyway, read this article in the wake of your recent minor track orientation. as you go through the process of selecting the minor track you wish to pursue, make sure that your choice is guided by reality as well idealism. the philippine press is facing a multitude of problems, not least of which is the issue of how it treats its journalists. 

after this reality check, does it change your mind about joing the profession? post about it!

ms wowie

So You Want To Work in the Media
by PJR Reports staff

(the original article can be found here: http://www.cmfr.com.ph/_pjrreports/2008/may-june/0508_story04.html)

Media practitioners have yet to see better wages and benefits, despite years of campaigning for an improvement of working conditions. Issues of wages, tenure, and job security have also haunted media workers for decades.
         
“Talents ” not employees

Contractualization is common in the Philippine media. Most TV networks hire reporters and other media workers as “talents” or program-based employees. Talents have no job security as they are not officially employed by the media companies. Positions considered as talents include reporters, producers, researchers, and production assistants.

Most ABS-CBN Broadcasting Corp. reporters, for example, are hired by Internal Job Management (IJM), an in-house agency overseeing the influx of talents and their assignments.According to Felisberto Verano, president of ABS-CBN’s Rank and File Employees Union, reporters under the IJM receive only a quarter of the usual rice subsidy, their health plans do not include dependents, and their bonuses depend on performance.

On the other hand, Union members—who are regular employees under  Republic Act (RA) No. 6715—receive full rice subsidies, insurance and bereavement pay, and bonuses including up to 15th month pay especially when company  profits are up. RA 6715, or the Herrera Law, prohibits contractual workers from joining rank-and-file workers’ unions.

Contractualization is common among broadcast networks  because contractual employees allow it, Samson Cor-dova, president of the National Alliance of Broadcast Unions (NABU) explained.  NABU is an alliance formed in 2001 by 10 company-based unions in six television stations and one  radio station.

Some talents work for one program or more while accepting projects from other networks. They call this naglalagari which means more earnings for employees. This would not be allowed if employees were regular. For example, Jocarlos Morales, cameraman, audio man, and lights man for GMA-7’s documentary program I-Witness, has chosen not to apply for regularization because the management will prohibit him from accepting extra jobs. It is considered a “mortal sin” for a regular employee in GMA-7 to work for other programs, he said.

Prepaid cell  cards

Morales receives  a net pay of P7,000 per month with only a monthly P300 prepaid cell card allowance and meal allowance as his benefits. Even worse, talents are not allowed to consume their meal allowances unless they have already worked for 10 hours, he said.

Media workers in ABC-5, on the other hand, are better off compared with their counterparts in other networks. Ed Lingao, head of ABC-5’s News Operation Department, said ABC-5 newsroom employees get higher wages compared to those in other,  bigger stations. ABC cameramen could earn from P15,000-P20,000, depending on seniority. Reporters’ salaries range from P13,000 to P30,000. Senior reporters or correspondents who are already in the supervisory level earn more.

More stable

Manila-based broadsheets, on the other hand, generally offer a more stable working environment. Most Manila-based journalists working for major national broadsheets are regular employees and receive benefits like transportation and food allowances.

The Philippine Daily Inquirer  pays the highest salaries among the Manila broadsheets. Employees’ benefits include 13th month pay, parental and other kinds of leaves, rice subsidies, and insurance, mostly because of the efforts of the workers’ union. 

According to Inquirer reporter Jeannette Andrade, who has been with the Inquirer since March 2007, she receives a monthly salary of between P15,000 to P20,000. She gets the usual benefits such as bereavement and hazard pay, rice subsidies, 13th month pay, and health insurance among others. The company, she said, also has a regularization policy through which a reporter is regularized after six months.

Similarly, The Philippine Star reporter Iris Gonzales described her working relationship with Star as “healthy.” “I have a healthy professional relationship with my superiors. The paper is run by a competent team. The compensation is also very competitive,”  Gonzales said in an e-mail interview. 

Measly rates

The same salary and benefits cannot be said to apply to correspondents. Unlike Manila-based reporters, most correspondents are not considered regular employees, so they do not receive standard salaries and benefits. Most correspondents also do not have any contract with the news organizations, meaning they have no employer-employee relationship with the news organizations they work for.

Each month’s take home pay varies for each correspondent. There are months when some correspondents would only take home a measly P3,000 while others receive about P10,000 to P25, 000. This is because everything depends on how many of their stories got printed.

Most news organizations pay correspondents only for published stories. Inquirer correspondents, for example, are paid based on the length and placement of their printed articles. One Inquirer correspondent said the company pays P0.30 per character or P35 per column inch. Thus, correspondents could get as low as P150 and as high as P2,000 per story. If their story is merged with that of other reporters, the payment would be divided among the number of reporters (one could get as low as P20 for a merged story). Other newspapers pay their correspondents for published stories regardless of length. Tabloids have lower rates compared to broadsheets, going as low as P5 per column inch.

Manila Bulletin correspondents, for their part, are treated as talents and are paid on a per article basis.

Some correspondents receive certain benefits only after meeting certain criteria, while others do not receive anything at all. Inquirer correspondentswho reach the 50-column inch minimum each month “could avail of transportation, Internet, and cell card allowances totaling P2,150,” according to Inquirer correspondent Nestor Burgos Jr. Some newspaper correspondents also qualify for a monthly retainer’s fee s low as P1,000 in addition to what they’re paid for published stories.

All work and no pay

There are also correspondents—either based in Manila or in the provinces—who are not paid at all. Eight months after leaving The Daily Tribune, Rommel Lontayao has yet to receive his complete paycheck from the paper. At the end of his three-month stint as a Tribune correspondent covering the Manila City Hall and nearby government agencies, he received only P5,000. That was a month’s pay, he told PJR Reports. He does not know how the Tribune came up with that figure considering that the paper had regularly published two or three of his articles each day for three months. The Tribune, he said, promised to pay him P100 for every published article. Lontayao is now a full-time reporter for The Manila Times.

Since provincial correspondents generally get lower salaries compared with those based in Manila, some work elsewhere for extra income without, they say, succumbing to corruption. Correspondents, for example, can send articles to local or regional newspapers.

“There are also NGOs which commission writing assignments, and Internet-based news outfits that pay  hefty sums for contributed articles,” Bong Sarmiento, BusinessWorld correspondent in Mindanao, said. 

Photographers share a similar fate with correspondents.  Dennis Sabangan, chair of the Philippine Center for Photojournalism, said that while photographers for wire agencies are paid P1,500-P3,000 per picture, the biggest newspapers in the country pay only P150-P250 per picture, P500 if it is used on  the front-page. He said tabloids pay a meager P50 per picture. Aside from having more freedom with their work, wire-based photojournalists are given more time to create pictures and are provided with all necessary equipment and support. 

‘A long and trying campaign’

The poor economic conditions of media workers undermine the quality of journalism in the country. “How can a journalist write critically if his pay is low, if he can be fired anytime by his newspaper, or if his newspaper does not have an advertisement because the journalist criticized a multinational corporation?,” asked National Union of Journalists of the Philippines (NUJP) chair Jose Torres Jr. “That company would not advertise in the newspaper and because of that, the (journalist’s economic) situation will not improve.”

The poor economic conditions of journalists thus affect the exercise of press freedom. Torres said that in reality, the Philippine media are not as free as many think, since journalists are dependent on the economic interests of media organizations.

These conditions  are among the factors responsible for media corruption. Torres said that while some reporters can be challenged and inspired by poor working conditions to fight harder for press freedom and better working conditions, some succumb to unethical practices such as accepting bribes. Some reporters also double as public relations officers of local government officials, while others solicit and/or accept money in exchange for favorable coverage.

It is not surprising, according to Philippine Press Institute executive director Jose Pavia, to find journalists who are unethical because they have to make ends meet. Some, he told PJR Reports, line up at politicians’ offices to ask for transportation money,  which can be as little as P20.

Pavia said journalists should be properly compensated to stop the mediocrity—abundant as it is at present—in the news coverage. “If you give peanuts, what do you get?” he asked. “Monkeys.”

Redmond Batario, executive director of the Center for Community Journalism and Development, agreed.

“One cannot expect a media worker to turn in high quality output when she is paid a pittance, is not given benefits, forced to work long hours, not provided with the necessary training and equipment, and generally considered simply as part of the fixture(s).” The campaign to improve the economic conditions of journalists will be a long and trying effort, former National Press Club president Roy Mabasa said. “This is the toughest problem that we (journalists)  face,” Mabasa said, adding “(w)hat we need to have is a sustainable (solution), not a one shot (deal).”

Pavia said news organizations  should ensure that they pay journalists well and on time. Otherwise, the credibility and integrity of the profession will continue to be affected.         

Advancing workers’ rights

Media unions have been vehicles in advancing workers’ rights, looking for long-term solutions to worsening labor problems. Joel Paredes, chair of the defunct Kapisanan ng mga Manggagawa sa Media sa Pilipinas, discussed in the book Labor and Mass Media in the Philippines (1988) that the tough competition in the media industry has prompted media workers to organize.

He said “(n)ewspapers continue to flood the market despite the uncertainty of profit. So many media owners expand operations at the expense of the workers’ economic benefits.” This led, he said, to the organization of unions as workers were exploited by their respective newspaper companies.

The Bulletin Progressive Union (BPU) is one of the five established unions in the print medium. Other print organizations which have unions are: The Inquirer, Malaya, Manila Standard Today, and the Journal Group of Publications.

June Usuan, president of BPU, said a regular employee is now given benefits and allowances such as sick and vacation leaves, midyear and Christmas bonuses, health insurance, and retirement pay among others. Usuan, however,  noted that correspondents, together with the employees under probation, are not covered by the CBA and thus are not entitled to benefits.

Contractual workers like correspondents and talents, as stated in the Herrera Law, do not have bargaining rights like regular employees.  “So dahil wala kang status, kung ano iyong nadatnan mong systema, iyon ang susundin mo (Because you do not have an employment status, you just follow whatever system they have when you arrive),” Tonette Orejas, a correspondent for the Inquirer, said. She said Inquirer correspondents are lucky to have  bureau chiefs who help them in dealing with  management.

In 2003, the Inquirer granted their correspondents’ plea for higher rates. NUJP has also been successful in helping correspondents get free copies of newspapers from their respective companies.

On  NABU’s part, Cordova said the alliance is trying to address the contractualization issue among TV and radio workers by working for an Industry Tripartite Council (Government-Employers-Employees) that would agree on defining the structure of the broadcast media. He explained that the council would serve as a venue for concerned parties to talk about labor issues: allowing all employees to join unions, stating which jobs are suitable for contractual and/or regular employees, the standardization of the wages of entry level employees, and a CBA, among others.

- with reports from Andres Paolo V. Tanchuling and Marrian P.R. Ching

Comments

( 28 comments — Leave a comment )
josetteemily
Aug. 13th, 2008 01:44 pm (UTC)
As I was reading the article, I got disappointed at how the media person are treated in terms of working salary. I also have a second thought whether to work or not to in this profession after graduation because the salary is so low. I mean who would want that?

Frankly speaking,I think that is the reason why most media person accepts bribe because they do not get enough benefits that they should get.

Imagine all the work and long hours they spent on the field trying to get substantial stories to feed the people's mind and yet they do not get anything.

But I salute the few who still sticks to their principle of fair and just reporting even though they do not get enough benefit. I also salute the people behind the organizations who are fighting and ensuring that the journalist are paid well and on time.
prinsesita_dada
Aug. 14th, 2008 01:51 pm (UTC)
i agree about the bribery because of lack of benefits and support from the companies.
bambampira
Aug. 14th, 2008 06:46 pm (UTC)
"reason why most media person accepts bribe because they do not get enough benefits.."
I agree, so now we know why.
prinsesita_dada
Aug. 14th, 2008 01:47 pm (UTC)
one word: SHOCK.

working in media is not as "FAME" as it was called. though i am not really discouraged, i am a bit sad about how some companies treat the media people. especially the employee to employee thing. i have this picture in my head that there is a healthy relationship in between.

also, i am surprised on the salary issue. i cannot believe that there were many who were not paid on time. so the OFWs were not the only ones suffering from that.

with that given situation, i know life ahead will be hard for me. However, because i love what i do and St. Scho is shaping me with values, and i am even blessed with very good professors who's guiding me, i believe that everything will be alright and i can survive such chaotic survival world of the press.
bambampira
Aug. 14th, 2008 06:42 pm (UTC)
Oh well....
with a corrupt government and the economy going down, what can we expect from the rest? that's the reality for all of us.

Everyone is affected; everyone needs big bucks to support their own families, and of course to survive the so called life.

The salary is so low indeed that who would want to join such profession? Oh well... After reading all the articles, and seeing all the comments.... my decision is still firm XD.

In the first place, we become media practitioners not for money. Why should we expect for high pays and stuffs... if these things are happening then all we need to do is to make a stand for it! *spiral of silence? XD
prinsesita_dada
Aug. 15th, 2008 02:13 am (UTC)
Re: Oh well....
oh i agree on that. but yeah, we need also some bucks to survive just like everyone else. T_T
pincessita
Aug. 15th, 2008 04:00 am (UTC)
I agree. Press people are forced to accept bribe though it's unethical because they are not paid lawfully.

Imagine them lining up at politicians’ offices to ask for transportation money, which can be as little as P20. That's how pathetic they've become.

Sympathetic, too. :(
tyni18
Aug. 15th, 2008 08:11 am (UTC)
I've heard before that the pay in the media profession isn't good but still my decision is firm to continue with this course. It's a fact that we enter college in order for us to make it on our own in the future, but wouldn't be better if we also entered college because our dream isn't only to be financially successful? I like what I heard from prof. lomibao in a lecture once. "Create the Change" she said. I do hope we all can create the change. =]
patsypats
Aug. 15th, 2008 02:05 pm (UTC)
uh oh!
First, thanks to the PJR Reports staff who made that article entitled "So You Want To Work in the Media." I became so enlightened with it.

Yes, I'm aware that the career just like what media has is a tough one, but I have not thought that it will be that disappointing to know. Imagine, some are even "naglalagari" as a contractual worker just to earn money. They are also being deprived of the apt benefits that they deserve. Whew, there's really more to find out.

Oh come on, with the selfishness, corruption and other unethical practices that people/media network pursue, who will not be greatly affected? *Well in this case, they are the reporters, PAs, producers, journalists and the like.* When will they be fair?

I'm glad that there are still organizations who really exert efforts in fighting for the media workers' rights. This just implies that we can still do something out of this depressing situation.
riscy0510
Aug. 15th, 2008 04:01 pm (UTC)
:(
I also agree! Because media person also needs to provide things that they need in order for them to survive especially now with the high price of commodities, If they can't get enough support or benefits from their companies, I think that's the time they are tempted to accept bribes.
trikzy
Aug. 15th, 2008 05:14 pm (UTC)
hmmm...
this article made me think again? do i really want to go in this profession. it's discouraging. i'm suppossed to work for a living; not the other way around. it's depressing. but since i'm almost at the end of my college years - that is if i get past this first sem - maybe i could something about it when i actually get into the business.
patchelle18
Aug. 16th, 2008 03:08 am (UTC)
Midterm in Comm Theory
Carl Hovland Theory tells that propaganda cannot change the opinion of other people. He also tells that it can change their opinion,but it will have along process and it cannot just happen in one night. One example is, Abu Sayaf. People are angry with this group because all they do is to kill and kidnap people and sometimes innocent people. We all know that they are bad, so no one can tell us that this group is not bad anymore and they change. Because it struck to our mind that they are terrible and bad people. It will not change people's opinion.

Another theory is the Cultivation theory, it tells that television becomes reality. Why? Watching too much tv makes that person think too many things. He/ she thinks that after they watch a program that the bad guy kills people. They will think that all the people around them is too dangerous and the world is not safe, at the same time they think that they are not safe here in this world.

Media dependency theory, talks about that people are so dependent in watching TV or other things related to media. Because people make TV their world, that is why when it is gone for a while. They feel that their life is incomplete without it, and things will never be the same again. For example, a brownout happened in their place. So that person will go crazy how he/ she will know the latest news now that their is no electricity. He/she feels lost and incomplete without it.


ayrahpadilla
Aug. 16th, 2008 04:02 am (UTC)
While reading this article one thing pops out of my mind, Why do media person is treated like an un-educated person? this article made me realize that i should pursue my dreams to become a media practioner someday... Why? Because I want to help in doing some changes and i want to speak out "How media practitoners should be treated."

Secondly, I realized that some of the media practitoners are not given much previleges especially when you are still new to your work. For me it should not be done because "i chose to work in your company not to be discriminated but to be treated like a part of it." I studied four years in college to learn about being a media practioner and everything so that, when i faced the real world of media I can say that i am well-molded by the institution that i came from. I know not all media practitoners are GOOD or EXCELLENT but you know what that's the reason why they choose to work. Also, because they want to LEARN MORE.

Well, as for my conclusion I hope someday someone will break The SILENCE and SPEAK OUT about "How media pactitioners should be treated well!" it's not always salary concerns, but it's all about how you do your work and how you are willing to learn from the real world. Proving someone that you're good should not always be your concern, but its all about doing your work with patience, interest and enjoyment. =)
batchigail
Aug. 16th, 2008 04:08 am (UTC)
midterm in comm theory
cognitive dissonance theory
by leon festingers
-people look for message that are consistent with their personal beliefs. t here are 3 ways to relieve cognitive diddonance first is the selective dssonance, expose yourself to the messenges you believe in. for example. In shampoo head & shoulder telss us that they are anti-dandruff then clear shampoo comes out and say that they are also anti dan-druff. the fact that i am expose to the message that head and shoulder is the anti dandruff, i will not believe clear shampoo i'll just stick to head & shoulder that's what i believe in.
next is the slective perception
-changing the negative things to positive. for example contraceptives but the media tells us that contraceptive good it can help us.
the last one is selective retention
-blocking of the negative thing you just remmebr only good things. for exmaple you lost your best friend in order to you to move on and not being trap in the past, you just rember good things with your late bestfriend.

ELABORATION LIKELIHOOD MODEL PERSUASION
by richard penny and john cocioppo
-this theory is how people process the information they receive. here we have ways of information processing first is the central route and the perpheral route. the central route critized the message for exmaple juice that is tetra pack you will set aside the picture you will see the nutrients that the juice wil give your child. while peripheral route you will not look for not so imporatnt message for example a juice that is tetra packed you wil just buy that juice because you just like the design of tyhe juice.

SOCIAL LEARNING THEORY
-in this theory we learn thAT how people learn behavior from t.v.
under this the observational learning- just observing things. for example your watching a movie, you just watching.. next is inhibitory effects-stop yourself doing negative. last is the disinhinlatory effects.

MAGIC BULLET THEORY
-Mass society theory
this theory one message have a uniform effect for example the stampede incident in ultra of the show wowowee. wowowee send a message that if they'll come they will win money. so many people come thats the rsult of wowowee stampede, next is for example we are the movie house someone shouted that there's a fire even if thought the other people dont see the fire. they will panic and run outside.
itsmeianne
Aug. 16th, 2008 06:39 am (UTC)
suggestion
my suggestion is what if a certain organization or institution (probably KBP) will produce PRESS ID which is exclusive only for those who really graduated from the course so that there is a certain standard that mass people would distinguish who the press really are. By choosing people who are graduates of the course, there is an assurance that they learned GOOD PRESS ETHICS. Also, by conducting this certain action, press could limit people who are "acting" like they are really part of the press. :)
joannetabije
Aug. 16th, 2008 12:01 pm (UTC)
“So dahil wala kang status, kung ano iyong nadatnan mong systema, iyon ang susundin mo (Because you do not have an employment status, you just follow whatever system they have when you arrive),”
-i still wanted to be a part of phil. media. yes, everybody started without any stat in the industry, but when you really love what you do, you do it without having anything in return, and as for me, imbibing the values that we have learned from our professors will be the best thing that i could share.
rubiegrace
Aug. 16th, 2008 12:21 pm (UTC)
After reading the articles, I realized that working in this profession requires 100% dedication. Integrity, responsibility, and honesty should always be intertwined to be able to surpass temptations in this kind of field. If you think about it, it's practical to accept money in exchange for something that you could actually give, but it's always a question of a person's dignity and integrity. If a person accepts money in exchange for something is just like allowing other people to buy his/her dignity and integrity. We should not be discouraged. This is not the end of a great opportunity, it is just the beginning. Everyone could be agents of change, and so this serves as a challenge for us, future practitioners, to lift the image of this kind of profession. We should never compromise our beliefs just for money.
beatrizeoria
Aug. 16th, 2008 02:37 pm (UTC)
beatrizeoria
I thank you Ms. Wowie for posting this article, this will really give us a reality check since we've decided for our minor-tracks. I also thank the writers who exposed the real situation of the philippine media.

I never realized that our journalists are give such low salaries. Now I know how tough it is in the real world after we graduate.

The school and other schools that teach mass communication teaches its students to follow ethics and to be moral in this industry (which is right, and I believe in it) but with the current situation that our country is experiencing (there's nothing cheap anymore this days) but its now wonder why some of today's journalists accept bribery.

I agree with what Mr. Roy Mabasa said:
“One cannot expect a media worker to turn in high quality output when she is paid a pittance, is not given benefits, forced to work long hours, not provided with the necessary training and equipment, and generally considered simply as part of the fixture(s).”
Its true how could journalists of these newspaper empires if they can't make ends meet. They're already having trouble producing a newsworthy story to get a high pay and thinking how could they keep up with low salaries and no health benefits.
mynameisfreedom
Aug. 16th, 2008 08:10 pm (UTC)
Yeah.. yeah.. yeaH!
Ang-ganda-ganda ng sinabi ni Rubie.

I agree with her in saying "we should never compromise our beliefs just for (the sake of earning) money."

Ako, personally, manhid na kasi ako sa sistema ng Pinas eh. Kaya kadalasan, parang wala nalang akong pakialam sa mga pinaggagagawa ng gobyerno. Iniisip ko nalang, bahala silang lahat. Mga uhaw sila sa yaman. Basta 'ko, walang pakialam sa kita.

I understand that this is the point in time when my mother needs me most. Kaya, ba-"back-up" ako sa kaniya. Bakit ko pa aalalahanin yung perang kikitain ko kung mawawalan din lang naman ako ng ipangpapakain sa pamilya ko sa hinaharap kapag walang kumilos ngayon? Kakayod nalang ako kahit mababa ang sahod o kahit sumusunod lang ako sa kontrata. (May trabaho pa naman ako eh. Mas masama kung wala.) Ang importante, kahit pa'no may magawa naman ako para maisalba yung buhay niya.

Our country is now suffering from brain drain. This is because almost all of our experts are already there in the other countries, offering their services to them, leaving their dying mother behind. Their main reason: MONEY! And the saddest part here is that just when we think that they are working hard to save Juan de la Cruz's life, there they are pocketing their money while slowly forgetting how they really managed to get to where they are now.

So, do I still want to work for the Philippine media? Aba! Why not, coconut?! Eh bansa ko 'to eh! Besides, I trust that the media is one of the most important things in the whole world. And it is the fourth state of our country and so for me, it's a privilege to be a part of it.

Our sick country is now dying and it needs us bad. Even just for once, let us try not to think about the money. All of us need to earn a living but then, what use can we get from the money if we no longer have our country in the future.
mynameisfreedom
Aug. 16th, 2008 08:13 pm (UTC)
Yeah.. yeah.. yeaH!
Ang-ganda-ganda ng sinabi ni Rubie.

I agree with her in saying "we should never compromise our beliefs just for (the sake of earning) money."

Ako, personally, manhid na kasi ako sa sistema ng Pinas eh. Kaya kadalasan, parang wala nalang akong pakialam sa mga pinaggagagawa ng gobyerno. Iniisip ko nalang, bahala silang lahat. Mga uhaw sila sa yaman. Basta 'ko, walang pakialam sa kita.

I understand that this is the point in time when my mother needs me most. Kaya, ba-"back-up" ako sa kaniya. Bakit ko pa aalalahanin yung perang kikitain ko kung mawawalan din lang naman ako ng ipangpapakain sa pamilya ko sa hinaharap kapag walang kumilos ngayon? Kakayod nalang ako kahit mababa ang sahod o kahit sumusunod lang ako sa kontrata. (May trabaho pa naman ako eh. Mas masama kung wala.) Ang importante, kahit pa'no may magawa naman ako para maisalba yung buhay niya.

Our country is now suffering from brain drain. This is because almost all of our experts are already there in the other countries, offering their services to them, leaving their dying mother behind. Their main reason: MONEY! And the saddest part here is that just when we think that they are working hard to save Juan de la Cruz's life, there they are pocketing their money while slowly forgetting how they really managed to get to where they are now.

So, do I still want to work for the Philippine media? Aba! Why not, coconut?! Eh bansa ko 'to eh! Besides, I trust that the media is one of the most important things in the whole world. And it is the fourth state of our country and so for me, it's a privilege to be a part of it.

Our sick country is now dying and it needs us bad. Even just for once, let us try not to think about the money. All of us need to earn a living but then, what use can we get from the money if we no longer have our country in the future ('cause it already died)?
rainie26
Aug. 17th, 2008 05:49 am (UTC)
outlook on the media profession
Wow!! A lot of people have already placed there comments here.

It saddens me to hear stories like these with regards to the treatment on media people and how the truth can still be manipulated.

I cannot personally blame journalists who are tempted to accept bribes and act unethically at times because they really have to earn something in order to survive in our society. I understand their views since I already quite taseted of how hard it is to produce good stories that are credible and substantive. Money is necessary for people to live and become productive in their chosen professions but I do not hink that they will become effective if their physical and psychological aspects are silenced by the low payments they receive. I mean, it's not a joke feeding the public with information that is of great relevance to them. Why should they run short of paying good money for the quality of work and effort that journalists and media persons exert?

Human Rights are inherent to human beings. But to the treatment of our fellow media practitioners, they are treated worst than animals running in a jungle searching for food, shelter, and security. These people are putting their lives at stake for the truth to come up and to be able to practice social presponsibility as citizens of this State. But if they do not take care of their employees, they cannot balms them for acting in such a manner that is against their principles in life.

Media people should be given more attention regarding the stability of their jobs and that they should be given justice to the rewards they receive for coming up with stories that reflect voices of the nation that are silenced by improper use of authority.

My thoughts of joining this kind of industry somehow discourages me but I've always believed that I have to take all risks in order to serve the needs of my fellowmen. Numerical figues cannot cover up the truth at all times. I would still fight for what I believe in no matter what happens. The public needs us for them to think about their lives and for the future of important people in their life. Long live press freedom and social responsibility!!!
itsmeianne
Aug. 18th, 2008 10:05 am (UTC)
comment
i agree on Rubie's perception. Being in this industry, we have to be really dedicated para di matukso ng pera. I admit, there are people na madaling masilaw sa pera. We just have to check ourselves every now and then if we are still practicing good press ethics so that we could commit the same mistakes of receiving money in exchange of something.
b_gatan
Aug. 19th, 2008 05:34 am (UTC)
just like any other job, it all goes down to you and your love for your work.it's not really about the pay that you get, as long as you have that dedication and passion for what you do then you wouldn't think that you're a loser in life.in this world, those that succeed are those individuals that see their work as their life.this is reality.
prinsesita_dada
Aug. 20th, 2008 07:31 am (UTC)
wee~ go gem!!
belle_earth
Aug. 20th, 2008 12:49 am (UTC)
salaries comment
it is surprising to see how the salaries of the employees of the bigger networks differ from that of lower networks... i've always thought that working in big shot companies earn more..but it is lesser and the work i believe id more demanding... - belle 302c
mynameisfreedom
Aug. 20th, 2008 02:50 pm (UTC)
SEGUE!
I'm feeling a bit tipsy (not because I'm drunk but) because of this:

"Tomorrow is going to be the start of our BIG DAY!"

Papa Jesus, thank You so much for this great opportunity. I believe that this is one good way of Yours to make us feel like great achievers! Yet, tomorrow, we will, again, be facing another tough moment in our live;

Tomorrow, it will be Your production day and we will stand as Your talents, Lord (we, students and our panelists). So please guide us. Please teach us how to use the wisdom in us so that we may be able to answer (correctly and effectively) every question for tomorrow's interview.

Please help us clear our minds. Please help us to emancipate from our so-called fear of the unknown (that braces almost all of us for so long now) for us to be able to muster all our courage that we need in order to face Your test. God, please lift all our fears and anxieties even just for one day. Pleas help us to try turning uneasiness into excitement. And please help us to be honest.

Once again, Thanks for EVERYTHING! Love You, Pop! You're THE BEST!

Amen.
mynameisfreedom
Aug. 20th, 2008 02:57 pm (UTC)
Re: SEGUE!
kulang ng ("S") yung LIVES,sorry. HAHA!
mynameisfreedom
Aug. 20th, 2008 02:50 pm (UTC)
SEGUE!
I'm feeling a bit tipsy (not because I'm drunk but) because of this:

"Tomorrow is going to be the start of our BIG DAY!"

Papa Jesus, thank You so much for this great opportunity. I believe that this is one good way of Yours to make us feel like great achievers! Yet, tomorrow, we will, again, be facing another tough moment in our live;

Tomorrow, it will be Your production day and we will stand as Your talents, Lord (we, students and our panelists). So please guide us. Please teach us how to use the wisdom in us so that we may be able to answer (correctly and effectively) every question for tomorrow's interview.

Please help us clear our minds. Please help us to emancipate from our so-called fear of the unknown (that braces almost all of us for so long now) for us to be able to muster all our courage that we need in order to face Your test. God, please lift all our fears and anxieties even just for one day. Pleas help us to try turning uneasiness into excitement. And please help us to be honest.

Once again, Thanks for EVERYTHING! Love You, Pop! You're THE BEST!

Amen.
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